Can Taking College Courses Slow Down Brain Aging?

exercise brain health

Brain aging is a complex issue, with a body of research still trying to explain why and how does it exactly happen. But, one thing is for sure – a change in your lifestyle can significantly benefit your brain in the long term. One of the main ways to exercise brain health in the years to come is by keeping your brain active. As a matter of fact, challenging your mind and learning through new experiences can stimulate new brain cell growth even late into adulthood.

Exercise Brain Health

There has been plenty of research which shows that, as we get older, the volume of our brain declines, particularly in the frontal cortex. It has been speculated that changing our diets, daily habits, and brain activity can influence this process and slow it down.

In particular, a study conducted by the University of Dallas shows that learning new skills can increase memory function in older adulthood. During this two-year project, adults were assigned to either learn a complex skill like digital photography or participate in more simple activities, such as puzzles. The findings of this study show that engaging in such activities greatly benefits our brains, especially our memory function.

Join a College Course

A fun way to exercise brain health is to sign up for college courses. This may be more popular than you think, with more and more colleges offering reduced or free tuition for senior citizens. Choose a subject you have always been interested in and start taking notes!

If you need help with choosing your courses, it might be a good idea to start learning a new language. In fact, there is evidence that bilingualism has a positive impact on cognition and delays the onset of dementia. That can still be the case even if you’ve learned the second language in late adulthood.

Final Word

To summarize, keeping your brain active in late adulthood is as important as keeping your body active. Exercise brain health, challenge yourself every day and keep learning new things. Staying mobile, both mentally and physically, can help your overall health in the long run.